Get yourself active blog

New quick guide from NICE and SCIE – What to expect during assessment and care planning

27 September 2018

Adults using care services should be supported to live their lives in the way they choose, so assessment and care planning should be focused on meeting their individual needs.

This new quick guide from NICE and SCIE explains what people should expect from social care staff during assessment and care planning and also covers the types of support they should be offered if they need help with expressing their views and wishes.

You can access the guide here:

What to expect during assessment and care planning

In other news: For links to health, social care and disability related information go here. 

How do we keep ourselves physically active?

26 September 2018

Today is National Fitness Day. Instead of writing about why you should get fit we’re showing different ways that some of our staff at Disability Rights UK keep ourselves physically active. And we’ve got the pictures to prove it too! We start with Sarah Johnson who is the Programme Officer for Get Out Get Active.

Sarah Johnston, Programme Officer for Get Out Get Active playing football.

I have always been a fairly active person but after sustaining an injury playing football and then having two children it became far more challenging to find both the time and an activity that interested me. My love is playing football but I didn’t think that I was ever going to be able to play again given the injury to my knee, my time constraints and now having tipped the balance of having my 40th birthday. Fortunately for me there is now a growing movement of women all of a certain age and fitness level 😊 that don’t necessarily feel comfortable at fitness classes, Women’s Veterans or recreational football is fabulous: it’s all about the social element it gets you out of the house; everyone involved is supportive of one another we each have constraints whether that is health conditions or family commitments but everyone appreciates the time that you can put in, we have great fun and we even play a little bit of football. I’m Sarah and this is how I keep myself active.

Leo Capella- Communications Officer Get Yourself Active

Anber looking ready for her afternoon walk with Leo… or maybe not.

I do physical activity mainly through walking Anber my sweet, cute, yet at times “independently minded” Turkish street dog around a certain town somewhere in Essex or outside of it. This gets me out of the house at least once every day and gives me some fresh air. Yet for all the fun or at times tug of war of walkies is working on Get Yourself Active has taught me that any extra physical activity I can do is good activity. So this why I use an outdoor gym nearby where I reside when I’m in London. And not just the chest press I also use the hand cycle which helps build my arm strength. And jump from platform to platform which was difficult to begin with but is now a lot easier.

   Ben Kersey- Operations Officer Disability Rights UK

Ben Kersey, Operations Officer at Disability Rights UK playing softball.

To stay active I play softball in the London Charity Softball League. We play weekly throughout the summer in parks across London. Our team, the Cantelopes, managed to win our group this year but was eliminated in the first round of knockouts ☹

This year I have taken up running and will be slowly crawling around the Royal Parks Half Marathon course in October.

Kirsty Mulvey- Engagement and Research Officer, Get Yourself Active

Kirsty Mulvey, Engagement and Research Officer for Get Yourself Active taking part in the 2015 British Championships in Crawley.

A huge part of the Get Yourself Active project is to promote the benefits of physical activity and sport. As the Engagement and Research Officer for Get Yourself Active, I practice what I preach.

I am a member of a Taekwondo club where I have been training since 2013. During this time I have earned my first and second degree black belts and won lots of medals through competing in sparring, patterns, special technique and board breaking. Yet, these achievements are not the thing that keeps me going back every week.

Taekwondo, like many other activities and sports, has many physical benefits such as losing weight, building or maintaining muscle mass, improving balance and improving strength. Being active can also build your confidence and help you to become more independent. It can improve your mental health, as well as give you a chance to see your friends, meet new people, become part of a team and part of the community.

When we go to competitions then we all support each other and we are there as a team. It doesn’t matter if you win or lose, and long as you try your hardest, don’t give up and learn from it – no matter what. I love seeing the friends I’ve made work hard every week and be a little bit better than they were the week before.

It’s not all hard work though. We’re very social and go out for drinks or meals together after competitions and at Christmas time, or attend each other’s birthday celebrations. We come from all different backgrounds, are all different ages and continually learn from one another.

Taekwondo keeps me disciplined and motivated. There always something new to learn, that next move to perfect or next belt to achieve. It’s so much fun and I love the rush of energy I have at the end of each class. Taekwondo might not be to everyone’s taste, but the benefits I get from it can be achieved through so many other sports and I encourage you all to find an activity that’s right for you.

In other news: There are many different ways that you can get physically active. Look at our information in your local area page for more information. 

Share your experiences in the Activity Alliance leadership survey

20 September 2018

Published by Activity Alliance

For too long, disabled people’s representation in senior roles and on boards within the sporting sector has remained low. Activity Alliance wants to understand the professional aspirations of disabled people and what support we could offer to enable more disabled people to pursue senior roles. This includes senior management and board membership, within the sport and active recreation sectors. To do this, we are calling upon disabled people and people with long-term health conditions to share their experiences and views.

The survey should take no more than 10 minutes to complete. We will not ask for any information that could identify you. Your answers will be used for research purposes, including understanding what might help disabled people to pursue leadership positions, as well as to develop a training opportunity. We may also use answers, including direct responses, to promote any support we develop in this area. Participation is voluntary. We will follow the Market Research Society Code of Conduct in undertaking this survey.

Activity Alliance has brought together an expert working group to support the project’s development. They are:

  • John Amaechi OBE – Chief Executive, Amaechi Performance Systems and Activity Alliance Vice President
  • Baroness Tanni Grey-Thompson – Crossbench Peer and Activity Alliance President
  • Jim Chaplin – Chief Executive, Sports Recruitment International (SRI)
  • Dr Phil Friend OBE – Consultant and Activity Alliance Vice Chair
  • Genny Cotroneo – BBC Get Inspired Producer and Activity Alliance Trustee
  • Liz Davidson – Head of Engagement, British Shooting
  • Andy Dalby-Welsh – Deputy Chief Executive, Activity Alliance
  • Sarah Brown-Fraser – Marketing and Communications Manager, Activity Alliance

Access the survey here.

More information

Participation is voluntary. We will follow the Data Protection Act 2018, the General Data Protection Regulation and the Market Research Society Code of Conduct in undertaking this survey. You can find further information about our privacy policy at www.activityalliance.org.uk/privacy.

If you have any questions about the survey or would like support to complete the survey, please contact Elliott Johnson, Research and Insight Manager. Email elliott@activityalliance.org.uk or on 0161 200 5441.

If you have any queries about this potential programme, please contact Sarah Brown-Fraser, Marketing and Communications Manager, at sarah@activityalliance.org.uk or on 0161 228 2868.

In other news: Take part in our research and receive a £15 Amazon Voucher

Spaces left on Coaching Disabled Footballers Course on 30 September

20 September 2018

West Riding FA still have spaces left on their Coaching Disabled Footballers Course. This course will be held at Middleton Centre in Leeds on Sunday 30 September 2018, 10am-5pm

The course costs £40 and covers both theory and practical elements. By the end of the workshop each participant should be able to meet the following outcomes:

  • Apply and extend your existing coaching skills and experience to meet the needs of players with a range of impairments
  • Establish basic communication skills for coaching disabled footballers
  • Use appropriate terminology
  • Identify appropriate safety and medical considerations
  • Plan a wide range of coaching sessions for disabled footballers
  • Using the Inclusion Spectrum, plan your coaching sessions to include disabled players or provide alternative appropriate opportunities
  • Understand the player pathways available for disabled players including the appropriate structure for competition.

 For more information on the Coaching Disabled Footballers course and book your space as soon as possible click here.

In other news: Chester FC Community Trust received a national award for its work supporting men who have experienced mental health problems.

New name, same game for communities

18 September 2018

Table Tennis England is putting a new spin on their project designed to help organisations introduce table tennis into the community. Previously called Loop in the Community, the initiative has been relaunched as Ping in the Community.

The name change is due to the project falling more naturally within the Ping! family alongside the Ping! festival and Ping Pong Parlours, which both bring free table tennis into the places people already spend time in their everyday lives.

The aims are unchanged. Ping in the Community will continue to help community groups and organisations get more active, healthy and closer together by supplying subsidised table packages containing everything required to get people, including disabled people, playing and enjoying the game.

Keely Armitt, Head of Participation at Table Tennis England, said:

“The ‘Community’ initiative aims to give all groups of society access to free or very affordable table tennis, and as such it aligns perfectly with the Ping! project which has successfully been delivering free table tennis in non-traditional places for the past nine years. Ping! has grown over time from a summer festival into a year-round project, with a vast reach, and the hope is that by embedding table tennis into community places, many more people will play the game regularly and enjoy the many health and well-being benefits this brings.

“Workplaces are still able to purchase subsidised table tennis packages through our Loop at Work initiative, and we also have a range of packages for the Clubhouse and Campus.”

The project has been well received by group leaders, who recognise it as a powerful way to help integrate and socialise their communities.

Community group leaders, said:

“It keeps residents occupied, helps with their memory as well as interaction. It’s a social activity that most enjoy.”

“Get’s people to join in, engage with everybody and is something anybody can do.”

“It’s brilliant. Everyone’s involved, everyone’s enjoying it and it’s a great way to keep fit!”

Playing table tennis can improve mental well-being, cognitive function and can build confidence and self-esteem. It’s an easily adaptable activity making it accessible for people with a range of impairments and long term health conditions. It doesn’t require a change of clothing and can be played in flexible short bouts.

To find out more about Ping in the Community, the benefits of social table tennis and to order your own community table tennis package, visit Ping England website.

In other news: Why get active? 

Get Yourself Active holds its first workshop for Social Workers in Essex

7 September 2018

On Wednesday 29 August Get Yourself Active held its first workshop for social workers in Essex on how to include physical activity for disabled people in social work. Social workers from across Essex attended a session in Ely House in Basildon. Also attending were Cecelia Kumar from Sport England and Leo Capella Communications Officer for Get Yourself Active.

Training sessions are being rolled out in key Get Yourself areas including Nottingham so that social workers can learn how to include physical activity into their work with disabled people. Basildon was a chance for me to get an insight into what happens in one of our workshops and share it with all of you.

Anna Pettican, trainer from our partner in Essex, Sport For Confidence described the workshop as “two hours to think about physical activity” and so it proved. Social workers talked about their own experiences of getting and keeping active which was important as it showed people their clients they had knowledge of the challenges .

We provided information such as through a nicely shaped pie or rather doughnut chart on how getting physically active can reduce the risk of cancers like colon cancer and heart disease. Or on explaining about Disability Rights UKs’ work. While I can’t and won’t go into what was said it was nice to see a receptive audience and learn about techniques such as the three conversations approach which is a new model for social workers to assess peoples needs and plan care. We also handed out our social work guidelines, which completed their journey from a packed box waiting to be distributed to being read and becoming part of someone’s toolkit.

A general and important point that came through the workshop is that it isn’t just intense physical activity through sport that can help it can be something as simple as doing chores or going out. And it’s not just the individual that’s involved in getting and keeping themselves physically active it’s the whole family among others that can be involved.
Then the session moved on to everyone talking about social work in Essex where I managed to pick up a few leads, including information about some interesting inclusive cycling in Southend. Above all though as with the other parts of the workshop it was nice to see everyone sharing their experiences and providing advice to each other.

And one more thing our beloved penguin mascot for Get Yourself Active got a chance to spread his small wings too. Although he observed proceedings he could not fill in our interesting Social Work guidelines baseline survey for social workers which was completed by all of them at the end of the workshop. Hopefully they will opt to stay in touch for the next phase of our work.

In other news:  Learn more about who is funding our work by going here.

High Cross Equestrian Centre Gains Accessibility Mark Accreditation

7 September 2018

A Leicestershire equestrian centre has secured an accreditation to a national scheme to encourage more disabled people to take up horse riding.

Thanks to its Accessibility Mark accreditation, High Cross Equestrian Centre, which can be found in the heart of the Leicestershire countryside, hopes to accommodate more disabled participants after successfully completing the training and criteria set out by the Riding for the Disabled Association (RDA).

The RDA, in partnership with the British Equestrian Federation (BEF), launched the revolutionary Accessibility Mark scheme to work with commercial riding centres with the aim of opening up more opportunities for disabled people to participate in riding.

The Association of British Riding Schools (ABRS) approved centre offers lesson to riders of all ages and abilities, with the opportunity to discover new experiences making powerful connections between horse and rider, either on the ground or riding, bringing a sense of achievement through progressive and therapeutic riding sessions

Senior coach Hayley Tomkins said: “High Cross is proud of achieving the Accessibility Mark and as a team we are looking forward to offering our clients the opportunity to discover new skills, and look forward to promoting the benefits of horse riding and pony care in a safe environment.”

For further information contact High Cross Equestrian Centre on 01455 208 175 or visit www.highcrossec.com

There are currently 51 Accessibility Mark-approved centres across the country.

To find your nearest RDA Group or Accessibility Mark centre visit www.rda.org.uk

In other news: Accessibility Mark reaches Golden Milestone.

Job Opportunity at Active Gloucestershire: Senior Project Officer £24-28K

7 September 2018

A talented Senior Project Officer / Community Project Manager who believes in the value of getting people active, is needed to join us.


You can expect an exciting role, visiting areas of the county, facilitating new relationships while project managing our Special Olympics Gloucestershire, Short Breaks for Disabled People and Older Adults Peer Support programmes.

Experience within physical activity / sports is not required, in fact, we would actively encourage applications from candidates who have not always loved sport or physical activity themselves but can demonstrate the ability to motivate, engage and empower everyone to get active every day.

Reporting to the Physical Activity Specialist for Older Adults/Disabled People, the Senior Project Officer / Community Project Manager will take the lead on the effective delivery, monitoring and evaluation of a range of funded programmes. On a day-to-day basis expect to build effective relationships with a range of organisations, manage budgets, attend networking events, contribute to training events, prepare reports, develop a sustainability plan, share learning, arrange and coordinate meetings, activities and events, identify opportunities to grow and anything else necessary to ensure the successful delivery of specific community programmes that target those who are least active.

To qualify … You could be a Senior Project Officer / Community Project Manager or similar with a CV that demonstrates:

  • Experience, at grass roots level, engaging underrepresented groups in new activities;
  • Project management experience across a number of projects;
  •  An understanding of the barriers and enablers to physical activity;
  •  Experience of managing finances and budgets;
  •  Excellent communication skills, both written and verbal;
  •  The ability to manage multiple priorities, troubleshoot and meet deadlines;
  •  The ability to develop effective relationships and partnerships with a range of organisations;
  •  A personal commitment to the vision and values of Active Gloucestershire.

Due to the nature of the role you will need to have a full UK Driving Licence or the ability to get around the county.

This is a rare opportunity for a Senior Project Officer / Community Project Manager to make a real difference to people’s lives and our success.

Closing date: Friday 21st September

Interview date: w/c 1st October (exact date tbc)

To apply please see our website:

http://www.activegloucestershire.org/about-us/current-vacancies.php

In other news: New strategy to change the reality of disability, inclusion and sport.

New strategy to change the reality of disability, inclusion and sport

Thursday 6 September 2018

Activity Alliance today (6 September) releases a new three-year strategy – Achieving Inclusion Together. Determined to change the reality of disability, inclusion and sport, the charity looks to a future where disabled people are just as likely as non-disabled people to be active. Leaders from Government, sport, leisure and third sector joined the call for action when the strategy was unveiled at Activity Alliance’s 20th Anniversary celebration last night.

Disabled people count for one in five of our population, but are currently the least active group in society and twice as likely as non-disabled people to be inactive. Participation rates have remained stubbornly resistant to growth for many years, despite Activity Alliance’s research showing that seven in ten disabled people want to be more active.

The new 2018-2021 strategy, Achieving Inclusion Together, drives Activity Alliance’s vision that disabled people are active for life. It builds upon the success as the English Federation of Disability Sport (EFDS) and sets the goals under the new operating name, Activity Alliance.

Based on clear outcomes by March 2021, the strategy outlines the desire to see the number of active disabled people on a sustainable upward trajectory. The three strategic outcomes will have an impact at different levels:
1. Individual: Enhanced health and well-being for all disabled people (physical, mental, social, emotional and economic well-being).
2. Societal: A more equal society in which disabled people can achieve more through increased opportunities and choice.
3. Organisational: A system where organisations have fully embedded approaches to inclusion into their mainstream work so they can effectively support individual disabled people.

September 2018 marks 20 years since the national charity formed. To celebrate this important milestone, partners and stakeholders joined Activity Alliance at a special evening reception in London, on Wednesday 5 September.

During the evening, Activity Alliance’s Chief Executive, Barry Horne called for actions not words. He urged leaders to use the robust insight and support available to deliver promises and make active lives possible for disabled people.

About the strategy, Horne said:
“Our ambition is to create a step change in the number of disabled people participating in sport and active recreation. Although some may see it as a challenge to engage so many inactive people, partners need to embrace the opportunity to make a real difference. We are confident we have the right framework to support a major upturn in disabled people’s activity rates, but we cannot do it alone.
“The barriers that exist for disabled people are wider than those they face in sport. It will take national and local government, organisations who serve disabled people, as well as sport and leisure providers to look inwards at their own strategies. Over the next three years, we look forward to working with a broader mix of stakeholders to develop stronger collaborative approaches.

“I’m extremely proud of our work over the last 20 years, but there is clearly a mismatch between what disabled people want and what sport and leisure offers. We cannot settle for the same old approaches being repeated year after year. Collectively, we can change the reality of disability, inclusion and sport and ensure more disabled people have opportunities to be active.”

Sport England’s Chief Executive, Jennie Price, said:
“I would like to congratulate Activity Alliance on their 20th anniversary and for their new strategy Achieving Inclusion Together. We welcome – and share – their determination to change the reality for disabled people who want play sport and be active.
“We recognise that the number of disabled people involved in sport and physical activity is too low, and although we understand more about the barriers they face, much more needs to be done to tackle them. That’s why we have identified disabled people as a key audience within our strategy Towards an Active Nation and we look forward to working closely with Activity Alliance to reduce the inequalities they have rightly identified.”

Activity Alliance 2018 – 2021 strategy, Achieving Inclusion Together, is available to read on the website (www.activityalliance.org.uk/strategy).
Find more information on Activity Alliance on www.activityalliance.org.uk

In other news: We have a range of resources relevant to the Get Yourself Active project. Do look at them for some happy and informative reading!

The latest WheelPower Feel Inspired Junior Sports Camp is coming soon.

4 September 2018

WheelPower are pleased to announce their latest  WheelPower Feel Inspired Junior Sports Camp is coming up on the 16th October 2018! This event is being held at Stoke Mandeville and will include sports such as table tennis, basketball, archery, fencing and tennis! The camp is open to people aged 12-18.

Entry to the event is FREE with family and friends also welcome to participate.

WheelPower’s Feel Inspired Junior Camps are a great way for young people aged 12-18 with a disability to discover sport in a safe, welcoming and friendly environment and all activity is adapted to suit your abilities. The Camps are a great way to make new friends, improve your health and have fun!

Time:

Registration is from 9.30am and the camp will finish at approximately 2:30pm.

Location:

There is plenty of accessible parking at the Stadium – make sure you give your vehicle registration number to reception and then parking is free all day!

The Stadium also has accessible toilets and changing facilities.

Cost:

Entry to the event is FREE including lunch which will be provided.​

Accommodation, if required, will be available on the nights of the 15th and 16th at the Olympic Lodge, Stoke Mandeville Stadium at an additional cost.

The deadline for registration and camp payment is the 5th October 2018.

Camp Information:

Who is the Camp for?

The Feel Inspired Junior Sports Camp is open to young people with physical or mild sensory impairments between the ages of 12 and 18 years of age, please note however younger participants may be included at the organisers discretion.

If any of the young people’s siblings or friends (of camp age) want to attend as well to enable them to take part in the activities togther then they are more than welcome – just let us know. The activities on offer can cater for disabled and non-disabled people.

We are expecting between 30 to 80 young people to attend the Camp.

Sports and activities:

The sports and activities at the Camp may include archery, cue sports, indoor athletics, shooting, table tennis, tennis and wheelchair basketball.

These activities ​are all about having fun, learning new skills and receiving coaching – this may include a small element of competition but this is optional.

Everyone will be welcomed to take part and the sports and activities will be suitable for you at a level at which you will feel comfortable.

Each sport will last for approximately 35-minutes but young people can go at their own pace and have rests when needed.

All of our sports coaches are qualified, have DBS checks and have lots of experience of delivering activity to young people who have different impairments and needs.

All young people attending can discuss their needs and support with the Event Manager and sport coaches in a safe and private environment before starting an activity.

For some of the sports at the camp you will be required to use your own wheelchair. Please ensure, if applicable, that you bring a chair that you are willing to use in activities at the Camp. WheelPower’s sports wheelchairs will be available for certain sports.

To register for the camp click here.

In other news: Find out what the Get Yourself Active project is all about and watch how people are making choices and taking control over being active…

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